AskDefine | Define must

Dictionary Definition

must adj : highly recommended; "a book that is must reading" [syn: must(a)]

Noun

1 a necessary or essential thing; "seat belts are an absolute must"
2 grape juice before or during fermentation
3 the quality of smelling or tasting old or stale or mouldy [syn: mustiness, moldiness]

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology

From mosten, past tense of motan, "be able to", cf. Dutch moesten and moeten.

Pronunciation

Verb

  1. (modal auxiliary verb, defective) The speaker—but not necessarily the subject of the sentence—is certain that the sentence predicate will be executed.
    If it rained all day, it must be very wet outside.
    (Compare with weaker auxiliary verb should, indicating a strong probability of the predicate's execution.)
  2. (modal auxiliary verb, defective) The execution of the sentence predicate is required. (Must usually implies that a negative consequence would otherwise result.)
    You must arrive in class on time.
    (Compare with weaker auxiliary verb should, indicating intent for the predicate's execution.)
  3. (Have two sense: imperative or directive) 'Imperative' creates an obligation, 'directive' defines conditions.
    Always a directive when used together with apply(application): No one can make you apply for anything.

Translations

must

Usage notes

  • Must cannot be used to indicate neither logical certainty, nor obligation in the past. As indicated above, the usual form is had to. It is possible to use be bound to for the past also.
  • For this reason, have to and be bound to are also used as alternatives to must in the present and future.

Noun

  1. Something that exhibits the property of being stale or musty
  2. Fruit juice that will ferment or has fermented, usually grapes
  3. A time during which male elephants exhibit increased levels of sexual activity and aggressiveness (also musth).
  4. Something that is mandatory or required.
    If you'll be out all day, sunscreen is a must.

Estonian

Adjective

must (genitive musta)
  1. defn Estonian

Hungarian

Noun

hu-noun ok

Swedish

Noun

must
  1. A kind of soft drink, more commonly known as julmust

See also

Veps

Adjective

must

Noun

must

Extensive Definition

Must (from Latin vinum mustum or "young wine") is freshly pressed fruit juice (most commonly grape), that contains various quantities of pulp such as skins, stems, and seeds, called pomace or fruit solids, which typically comprise between 7–23 percent of the total weight of the must. These components, and the time they are allowed to be in contact with the juice, are critical to the final character of the wine.
When the winemaker judges the time to be right, the juice is drained off the pomace which is then pressed to extract the juice retained by the matrix. Yeast is added to the juice to begin the fermentation, while the pomace is often returned to the vineyard or orchard to be used as fertilizer. A portion of selected unfermented must may be kept as Süssreserve, in order to be added prior to bottling as a sweetening component.
Some winemakers create a second batch of wine from the used pomace by adding a quantity of water equivalent to the juice removed, letting the mixture sit for 24 hours, and draining off the liquid. This wine may be used as a drink for the employees of the winemaker or as a basis for grappa.
Must was commonly used as a cooking ingredient in ancient Rome. It was boiled down in lead or bronze kettles into a milder concentrate called defrutum or a stronger concentrate called sapa. It was often used as a souring agent and preservative, especially in fruit dishes. Geochemist Jerome Nriagu published an article in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1983 hypothesizing that defrutum and sapa may have contained enough lead acetate to be of danger to those who consumed it regularly.
This term is also used by meadmakers for the unfermented honey-water mixture that becomes mead. The analogous term in beer brewing is wort.

Must in Christian liturgy

In Roman Catholic liturgy, must may be substituted for sacramental wine, on condition that the ordinary has granted permission for the benefit of a priest or lay person who has difficulty, usually because of alcoholism, in ingesting wine; but in normal circumstances it may not be used in place of wine.
This teaching goes back at least to Pope Julius I (337-352), who is quoted in Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica as having declared that in case of necessity, but only then, juice pressed from a grape could be used. Aquinas himself declared that it is forbidden to offer fresh must in the chalice, because this is unbecoming owing to the impurity of the must; but he added that in case of necessity it may be done.

References

External links

must in Latin: Mustum

References

  • Ron Herbst and Sharon Tyler Herbst; Wine Lover's Companion; Barron's; ISBN 0-8120-1479-0 (paperback, 1995)
  • Marian W. Baldy, Ph.D.; The University Wine Course - A Wine Appreciation Text & Self Tutorial, 2nd Edition; The Wine Appreciation Guild; ISBN 0-932664-69-5 (paperback, 1995)
  • John Whittaker; Winemaking; Lone Pine Publishing; ISBN 1-55105-030-7 (paperback, 1994)
  • Jerome O. Nriagu; Saturnine Gout Among Roman Aristocrats: Did Lead Poisoning Contribute to the Fall of the Empire?; New England Journal of Medicine 308(11):660-3, 1983 Mar 17.;
  • Ilaria G. Giacosa; A Taste of Ancient Rome; University of Chicago Press; ISBN 0-226-29032-8 (paperback, 1994)

See also

must in Czech: Vinný mošt
must in German: Traubenmost
must in Modern Greek (1453-): Μούστος
must in Spanish: Mosto
must in Esperanto: Mosto
must in French: Moût
must in Croatian: Mošt
must in Italian: Mosto
must in Dutch: Most (oenologie)
must in Polish: Moszcz
must in Portuguese: Mosto
must in Russian: Виноградное сусло
must in Sicilian: Mustu
must in Slovak: Mušt
must in Swedish: Must

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

absolute, allegiance, assigned task, bare necessities, be forced, be in for, be necessary, be obliged, binding, blast, blight, bounden duty, burden, burning, business, call for, call of duty, cancer, canker, cannot do otherwise, cannot help but, charge, commitment, committal, compulsory, conclusive, condition, de rigueur, decisive, deference, demand, demand for, demi-sec, desideration, desideratum, devoir, devotion, dictated, domestic wine, dry rot, duties and responsibilities, duty, entailed, essential, essentials, estral, estrous, estrual, ethics, extra sec, fealty, fetidity, fetidness, final, foulness, frowst, frowstiness, frowziness, fungus, funkiness, fustiness, hard-and-fast, have, have got to, have need to, have to, homage, hot, imperative, imperious, imported wine, imposed, in heat, in must, in rut, indispensable, irrevocable, light wine, line of duty, loyalty, malodorousness, mandated, mandatory, mildew, mission, mold, moldiness, moth, moth and rust, must item, mustiness, musty, necessaries, necessary, necessities, necessity, need, need for, need to, needs must, new wine, noisomeness, nonvintage wine, obligation, obligatory, occasion, odorousness, offensiveness, onus, ought, ought to, peremptory, pest, pink wine, place, prerequirement, prerequisite, prescript, prescriptive, putridness, rancidity, rancidness, rankness, reastiness, red wine, repulsiveness, required, requirement, requisite, requisition, respect, right, rose wine, rot, rottenness, rust, rutting, ruttish, rutty, sec, self-imposed duty, should, sine qua non, smelliness, smooth wine, smut, sparkling wine, still wine, stinkingness, stuffiness, sweet wine, the necessary, the needful, thin wine, ultimate, vin, vino, vintage wine, want, white wine, wine, without appeal, worm
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